Here's How to Create the Perfect Wedding Hashtag (And Make the Most of It)

For many modern couples, finding the perfect wedding hashtag is just as important as hiring the perfect photographer. With friends and family able to take hundreds of their own pictures of your wedding (provided it's not a phone-free affair), the perfect hashtag makes it easy for you, and everyone else, to find the shots everyone took. Research shows that over half of marrying couples use a wedding hashtag for social media like Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook, not just to find all the pictures later but to give people a way to watch the wedding unfold in real-time as pictures are posted.

However, some hashtags work better than others. And there's tons of pressure for couples to be super clever and funny with it, coming up with something no one else could. There's an art and science to both finding the perfect one, and using it wisely. And while you can hire a professional writer to come up with your wedding hashtag, not everyone has room in their budget for social media help.

So, if you've ever wondered how to create the perfect hashtag, read on!

Get Punny

Wedding Hashtag IdeasThink of both of your last names, and try to use them to come up with puns. If coming up with puns doesn't come naturally to you, take out a thesaurus and rhyming dictionary, and find love-related words that your names rhyme with. For example, if the groom's name is Alex Gappey, you could use the hashtag #TheGappyCouple or #GappilyMarried. If the bride's name is Katie Engle, and the groom's name is Scott Schmidt, you could use something like #BlessedByAnEngle or #CompletelySchmitten. Brainstorm by looking up words associated with romance, like:

  • Crush
  • Angel
  • Smitten
  • Enchanted
  • Head over heels
  • Sweet on/Sweeten
  • Romance
  • True love
  • Magic
  • Under the spell
  • Over the moon
  • Enamored
  • Sweet
  • Tender
  • Doting
  • Soulmate
  • Other half
  • Forever
  • Eternity

Alliteration is an Assuredly Awesome Ally

Perfect Wedding HashtagsSo this may be news to you, but you don't HAVE to use a pun in your wedding hashtag. Something easy to remember and fun will work well, pun or not. And if you're not going the pun route, alliteration is your best friend. Again, start with the list above and run the words through a thesaurus. Then, let your creativity run wild. Named Gretchen Kilkenny? Yours can be #KindredKilkenney or #KissedbyKilkenny.

Use a Rhyme, Save Some Time

Perfect Wedding HashtagsOnline rhyming dictionaries are a great way to come up with a clever-sounding rhyme in very little time (hey, that line was mighty fine!).  Using our pretend bride Gretchen Kilkenny, pics of her being embraced by her new husband could be hashtagged, #FetchedtheGretch. Or, if we use Scott Schmidt from before, a couple could use #CommitToSchmidt.

Make It Unique

Perfect Wedding Hashtag TipsOtherwise-good hashtags can become totally terrible when you already have thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of other people using them. For example, #LifeWithLouie might be a great hashtag for a happy bride beginning a beautiful life with her soulmate...except that Instagram already has  almost 14,000 posts with that tag. It's all thanks to an adorable golden retriever named Louie, and a slew of posts related to actor Louie Anderson.

The fewer people using your wedding hashtag who AREN'T associated with you, the better! Do a quick search and see what kind of competition your hashtag idea might have.

Pull a Brangelina

Wedding Hashtag IdeasIf there's a snappy, clever way to merge your names, it can make for a fun and unique wedding hashtag that won't have much competition on Instagram. If Jack Constantino is marrying Greg Johnson, they could become #JegJohnsontino or #GrackConstantonson (though shorter is better, you can't help it if your name is on the longer side). Ophelia Greene and Colton Frenkel could become #CopheliaGrenkel.

They always come out silly, which is part of the fun. Just try to come up with sound combos that roll off the tongue. These name combos work best when the names have lots of different sounds between them, but a set or two of vowels in common -- think of how different "Brad" and "Angelina" are, but they have enough parts alike to be easily combined.

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